room | Edgar Lessig

Noah und der große Regen & War of the Worlds
Stage Design / Landestheater Linz / 2018

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Noah und der große Regen & War of the Worlds - Landestheater Linz (2018): model full
model full
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Noah und der große Regen & War of the Worlds - Landestheater Linz (2018): closeup 1
closeup 1
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Noah und der große Regen & War of the Worlds - Landestheater Linz (2018): closeup 2
closeup 2
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Noah und der große Regen & War of the Worlds - Landestheater Linz (2018): closeup 3
closeup 3

Nele Neitzke, art director of "Junges Theater" of the "Landestheater Linz" came up with the idea of playing two plays just on one versatile stage design.
"Noah und der große Regen", the story about noah's ark and "War of the Worlds" an adaptation of Steven Spielberg's movie are both meant for children of different ages.

Requirements:
"Noah und der große Regen": playful and fantasy stimulating environment, height differences, water, seeking shelter;
"War of the Worlds": closed environment in which media has a monopol like position on news, height differences, seeking shelter, Videoprojection;

The stage describes a common street of the austrian suburbs or small towns. There is the ground floor of a not to well looked after house, a bench, a junction box and a part of a play street to be seen.

For "Noah und der große Regen" the setting is used as followed: The childern's room is being extended through the window to the outside until finally the toys are being completely relocated to the street, for the reenactment of the story of Noah's ark. Junction box, stairs and bench serve as save places against the water. The actors can paint on the walls with chalk or play with water on the street coming from the gutter. The play street is the children's room and garden for all the small town apartment kids. There they reenact their fantasies and invent their stories.
In "War of the Worlds" the street has become a meeting point of two people. They are sitting on the bench, looking out of the window, or coming by with pushed bicycle. They take a seat and chatter. A typical small town scenery. The news of the disaster, spreading around the town by word-by-mouth, are told each other. The space above the bench could be used as projection surface for TV news broadcast. Discomfort is caused by the tame calmness underlying the town. Nobody knows for sure what is happening, only the media has the power of the truth. The exaggeration of news (which the play also thematizes) works in this town even more than anywhere else.

The main thought underlying the stage is that nothing should be rearranged. The street stays street and the house stays house. This place is an ambivalent space. It is what the inhabitants and the circumstances make of it.

Höllenangst w/ Maria Schwarzmayr
Stage Design / Theater Perpetuum / 2018

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Höllenangst - Theater Perpetuum (2018): scene 1
scene 1
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Höllenangst - Theater Perpetuum (2018): scene 2
scene 2
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Höllenangst - Theater Perpetuum (2018): scene 3
scene 3
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Höllenangst - Theater Perpetuum (2018): scene 4
scene 4
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Höllenangst - Theater Perpetuum (2018): scene 5
scene 5
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Höllenangst - Theater Perpetuum (2018): scene with Bernhard Scharl, Georg Wandl and Susanne Denk
scene with Bernhard Scharl, Georg Wandl and Susanne Denk
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Höllenangst - Theater Perpetuum (2018): scene with Hasan Ocak, Bernhard Scharl and Hans-Jörg Kickinger
scene with Hasan Ocak, Bernhard Scharl and Hans-Jörg Kickinger

"Höllenangst" by Johann Nestroy is a play about confusion and mistaking, which leads to plenty of different fast changing scenes. The only element being present in almost every setting is some kind of room. Therefore our key element is a cube portraying a simplified archetype of a room. For each scene the cube has a different position on the stage, representing an anchor point of the implied spaces that are somewhere settled around. Even every space itself is only a simplified version of its own. What's necessary is there, the rest is left out.
An industrial plastic curtain is covering the backside of the cube, embodying a wall on the one hand but also providing the opportunity of fast entrances and exits on the other hand, on a stage that is normally limited to almost only on possibility of entering.

Everything changes fast. The change is being appreciated. Lights stay on.

director . . . Gerhard Egger
costume . . . Ale Elsbacher
stage design . . . Maria Schwarzmayr, Edgar Lessig
stagehands and lighting design . . . Thomas Gallhuber

photos of actors: copyright by Christian Kellner

weil so hallo 6. märz kommerz so schneller im keller w/ Alexander Till, Miriam Roithinger, Matthias Tremmel
Installation / UFG University of Art and Design Linz / 2018

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weil so hallo 6. märz kommerz so schneller im keller (2018): front 1
front 1
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weil so hallo 6. märz kommerz so schneller im keller (2018): front 2
front 2
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weil so hallo 6. märz kommerz so schneller im keller (2018): above
above
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weil so hallo 6. märz kommerz so schneller im keller (2018): closeup 1
closeup 1
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weil so hallo 6. märz kommerz so schneller im keller (2018): closeup 2
closeup 2
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weil so hallo 6. märz kommerz so schneller im keller (2018): back
back

One room. 4 weeks. Us.

But who is us?

A group that defined we are not gonna be a group, but a network.
A group that defined, we are not gonna make any plans about what we do.
A group that didn't want to coordinate the working process.
A group that stayed a group and not a network.
A group in which each member had different plans.
A group that had difficulties coordinating those plans.

A group that worked in one room for 4 weeks.

UnHeim w/ Maria Schwarzmayr
Installation / UFG University of Art and Design Linz / 2017

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UnHeim (2018): installation full
installation full
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UnHeim (2018): closeup 1
closeup 1
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UnHeim (2018): closeup 2
closeup 2
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UnHeim (2018): closeup 3
closeup 3
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UnHeim (2018): closeup 4
closeup 4
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UnHeim (2018): closeup 5
closeup 5

This space doesn't belong to you anymore, not even itself.
Something else breaks into the renowned. Only with caution can you move between the new, without its collapsing, damaging everything around. Is the new just a feeling? Does it come from the inside, from the outside, from yourself?
Everything feels narrow, tight, uneasy.
Long-known becomes unfamiliar.
Leave or bear?